Muhammad Faris Nabil’s 21-day sacrifice to ward off invisible enemy

by BERNAMA

KODIANG – Muhammad Faris Nabil Zaidi  went “missing” for 21 days from his house in Kampung Siputeh near here, sacrificing the comfort of home, out of a sense of responsibility to keep villagers  safe from the invisible ‘enemy’.

The 20-year-old man was among 23 youths who volunteered to take turns to man a checkpoint set up by Kampung Siputeh Rukun Tetangga Community (KRT) from last Aug 7 to 27 to prevent COVID-19 from spreading into the village.

“I felt like I was an army recruit having to face the enemy while controlling traffic entering the village when manning the checkpoint, which  set up at the main road leading to the village.

“I volunteered to do it because I feel it is my responsible to protect the villagers and their families from this very dangerous and invisible enemy called COVID-19,” said Muhammad Faris Nabil when met by Bernama.

He said the KRT management provided a place for him and the other volunteers who manned the checkpoint to stay throughout the 21 days as they were not allowed to go home for the  safety of their respective family members.

“It’s a small sacrifice, but I feel very happy and proud to be able to do my bit to ensure the safety of the villagers from COVID-19,” he added.

Muhammad Faris Nabil said he asked for his mother’s permission before joining the other volunteers to man the checkpoint.

“Since I could not go home, she would call me everyday to ask about my condition, whether I was okay, had taken my meals, but the most meaningful lesson I got when I was one of the volunteers at the checkpoint is that it teaches me to be more disciplined, trustworthy and more responsible,” he added.

Meanwhile, vice-chairman of the village KRT, Fadilah Saad said residents in the village, especially the young people, are active in volunteer activities.

“Those who volunteered to man the checkpoint did it voluntarily. They are not paid any allowance,” he said, adding the checkpoint was set up with the permission of the police and the Health Ministry.

He said the volunteers took turns to man the checkpoint, with three people on duty every four hours.

The volunteers also conduct patrols in the village.

He said outsiders could not enter the village if they had no important matters to attend to and delivery of goods in the village was allowed only until up to the checkpoint to avoid outsiders bringing the virus into the village.

“If there is a need to pay delivery charges, anyone who works at the control post will pay first and the KRT management will refund it. The package will then be sanitised before it is sent to the recipient,”  he added.