Research: Malaysians favour new coalition amid political unrest

by SHAHEERA AZNAM SHAH / graphic by MZUKRI MOHAMAD 

MALAYSIANS are keen on an establishment of a new coalition should the government be reformed, said UCSI Poll Research Centre.

The poll results on the preference of government formation conducted among 1,053 Malaysians showed that 69.9% of the respondents answered “Yes” when asked if Malaysia needed a new government.

“The margin of sampling error for this sample size was +/- 3%.

“The respondents who answered ‘Yes’ were further asked on which coalition they would support if there is a government reformation,” the research centre said in a statement yesterday.

The results showed that 66.3% of the respondents will support a new coalition ,while 33.7% of the respondents will support Pakatan Harapan.

From the respondents who were in favour of a new government, almost half hoped that there would be in place a strategy in battling the Covid-19 pandemic, while 28% hoped for a recovery in Malaysia’s economy.

Among other expectations include the government’s commitment in battling corruption, as well as the commitment to safeguarding livelihood in Malaysia’s Budget 2022.

“While the respondents who chose ‘No’ were further asked if the current (previous) government will continue to rule despite being a minority government, 79.1% answered ‘Yes’ and 20.9% of the respondents said ‘No’.

“For the respondents who answered the latter, the main reasons for why they thought Malaysia did not need a new government are because the Perikatan Nasional (PN) government should be given time to focus on battling the pandemic; no difference with a new government; the PN government is doing fine and reforming a new government will slow down the economic recovery,” it said.

The research centre added that the poll results signalled that the public was hoping for a new government to form a new coalition and that the political unrest has fatigued the public emotionally, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic with cases spiking daily.