Health DG suggests for shorter Parliament sitting

Pic by MUHD AMIN NAHARUL

HEALTH DG Tan Sri Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah had proposed for the current Parliament sitting to be shortened to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

During a coordination meeting for matters related to the special Parliament session on Monday, the Health Ministry (MoH) and the National Security Council have come up with several standard operational procedures (SOPs) to reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection throughout the special sitting.

MoH also suggested that the number of physical attendances be reduced.

“To ensure the special session of Parliament to run smoothly, all individuals must follow the existing SOPs, rules and regulations,” Dr Noor Hisham said in a statement yesterday.

The SOPs include that all individuals must undergo the RT-PCR test three days before attending the Parliament and five days for the media, parliamentary staff and contractors.

A National Public Health Laboratory booth has been set up at the Parliament to provide the RTK-Ag Self-Test Kit Saliva service for self-screening of individuals with symptoms.

“As of July 28, four close contacts have been confirmed positive for Covid-19 and have not been present since the first day of the sitting and are being monitored by the health authorities,” Dr Noor Hisham said.

Yesterday, four positive cases were detected at the Parliament, leading to the session being adjourned until next Monday.

The DG added that all Parliament attendees were instructed to screen for Covid-19 between July 21 and July 25 either at the Parliament complex, Putrajaya health office, government or private health facilities.

“Out of 2,093 individuals who underwent screening, 56 tested positive as of July 28, involving two MPs, six escort officers and 48 officers from various government agencies.

“Of these 56 positive cases, 39 had not received a complete vaccine dose or had not received the vaccine,” he said.

As a result of investigations and risk assessments conducted as of Wednesday, these positive cases had no epidemiological correlation with each other.