Malaysians’ median monthly income rose 6.6% to RM2,380 last year

Mohd Uzir says the median income for employees with primary education charted the highest growth in 2018 as the group’s median income rose 8.1% YoY to RM1,518 from RM1,400

by SHAHEERA AZNAM SHAH/ pic by HUSSEIN SHAHARUDDIN

THE median of monthly income for 8.8 million workforces in Malaysia has increased by 6.6% year-on-year (YoY) last year to RM2,308 from RM2,160 in 2017.

Department of Statistics Malaysia chief statistician Datuk Seri Dr Mohd Uzir Mahidin said the median of monthly income for employees in the urban area has increased by 6.6% to RM2,415 while the rural area grew 5.6%.

“The average monthly income for Malaysians grew 7% YoY to RM3,087 from RM2,879 in 2017, while the ave-rage monthly income in the urban and rural areas rose 7.5% and 2.1% respectively,” he said in the Salaries and Wages Survey Report 2018.

Measuring the income growth across educational achievement, Mohd Uzir said the median income for employees with primary education charted the highest growth in 2018 as the group’s median income rose 8.1% YoY to RM1,518 from RM1,400.

The median income for employees with tertiary education rose 7% YoY to RM3,648 from RM3,400 in 2017, while employees without formal education rose 5.8% to RM1,166.

The report also showed that last year, 84,000 of new employees have entered the domestic workforce.

The survey defined a paid employee as a person who works for at least six hours a day or at least 20 days a month.

Last week, the Institute of Labour Market Information and Analysis (ILMIA)’s National Wage Index report released by the Ministry of Human Resources said the basic wages among Malaysians in Peninsular rose 11.3% in the fourth quarter of 2018 (4Q18) over 10 consecutive quarters, while the basic wages in Sabah and Sarawak grew 7.6% and 9% respectively.

ILMIA said the growth of basic wages for the public sector in 4Q18 had surpassed the private sector as the income for the government employees increased by 11.2% within the observational period while the private sector rose 10.5%.

The report also revealed that among the nine occupations compared to the public and private sectors, six designations — managers, technicians, clerical support, skilled agricultural workers, craft-related workers and elementary occupations, from the public sector had a higher salary growth than from the private sector.

Meanwhile, commercial sales agents, chefs and machinery assemblers recorded the least growth in the median basic wage, while wood processing plant operators, restaurant managers and construction supervises reported negative or stagnated growth.