IRB decries viral post on race-based tax data

By NG MIN SHEN / Pic By ARIF KARTONO

THE Inland Revenue Board (IRB) has refuted a recent viral social media claim stating that taxpayers’ details and tax collection data are recorded based on race.

In a statement yesterday, the IRB said it detected false information currently circulating on social media regarding an alleged white paper presented by the IRB in Parliament entitled “Who says the Chinese and Indians pay more taxes to the government?”.

“The IRB wishes to stress that there is no such presentation of a white paper involving reports related to the amount of taxes paid based on race in Malaysia, in Parliament by the IRB, as stated in these social media claims.

“Based on the IRB’s standard operating procedure, taxpayers’ information and tax collection data are not recorded based on race. As such, the IRB wishes to stress that the data being spread on social media is not true and is not sourced from the IRB,” it said.

According to the board, the data and details regarding taxpayers that are recorded in the IRB’s system are categorised according to taxes paid by individuals and companies.

The information is available on the IRB’s official portal at www.hasil.gov.my, as well as on the Finance Ministry’s official website.

“Therefore, the IRB wishes to once more advise the public not to spread inaccurate information to avoid confusion and misunderstanding, for the sake of all,” the board added.

The false data in question initially surfaced on a Facebook account known as “Shuaib Post” in a post captioned, “Siapa kata bangsa Cina & India banyak bayar cukai dekat kerajaan? (Who says the Chinese and Indians pay more taxes to the government?)”.

The Facebook post claimed to cite a white paper submitted by the IRB in Parliament that contained records of taxpayers from 2015 to 2018 based on race. Quoting the data, the post said Malays were the largest contributors to taxes at 63% or RM97.85 million, followed by Chinese taxpayers at 13% or RM33 million and Indian taxpayers at 1.8% or RM2 million to RM3 million.

The post said “the myth that the Chinese pay the most taxes is a lie”, based on IRB data. It also said “the Chinese prefer to avoid paying taxes because they do not like the Goods and Services Tax”.